brightwalldarkroom:

"Never try to convey your idea to the audience - it is a thankless and senseless task. Show them life, and they’ll find within themselves the means to assess and appreciate it."
—Andrei Tarkovsky
volcranis:

Kerry Skarbakka - The Struggle To Right Oneself, 2014
nycartscene:

Fall 2014 Editor’s PickOpens Tues, Sept 9, 6-8p:“RITE OF PASSAGE: The Early Years of Vienna Actionism, 1960 – 1966” Günter Brus, Otto Muehl, Hermann Nitsch, Rudolf SchwarzkoglerHauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th St., NYCthe first major New York City exhibition to explore, through rare paintings, collages, and photographs, the emergence of a critical 20th-century avant-garde movement. Various artistic developments in the second half of the 20th century have been influenced by a performative paradigm that emphasizes a move away from formal, static objects and toward more directly experiential, event-like, and sensorial gestures. In the early 1960s, the Vienna Actionists defined their radical style through a critique of painting, specifically that of European Art Informel and the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. Under Austria’s Second Republic, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, and Schwarzkogler sought out new possibilities for expression that could transcend the shadow of World War II. Motivated by material experimentation, they developed their art around radical body-centric performances through which authentic experiences of reality and incisive political statements could be directly and intensely perceived.
made it to california
red-lipstick:

Daniel Sanchez Guzman (Bogotá, Colombia) - This Is What Happens When You Watch TV Medicated By Dr. Hoffman, 2007     Photography
goldenveil:

‘Pigeon feeding near Blue Mosque’, 1991, Steve McCurry

Salvador Dali - The Woman with a Head of Roses (partial)
occupt:

Know Your Enemy
visualobscurity:

Tom Waits.
tonisphoto:

Evaporation, 2013
theplaylistfilm:

"I was really trying to capture—it sounds kind of grandiose or something—just the way time unfolds in our lives, or the way we go through maturing. Something as simple as that."
Interview: Richard Linklater talks ‘Boyhood’